Tag Archives: fine art photography

Pictures of Health | New Print Installations at Dayton’s Miami Valley Hospital

I’m happy to announce the photographs I captured on assignment last summer are now installed as backlit wall display prints at the soon-to-be opening of the remodel of the Rubicon Cafeteria at Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton. I am very thankful for the business and opportunity. This project was a creative collaborative effort with Deck the Walls and App Architecture.

Installed prints of food photography by Jim Crotty in the remodel of the Rubicon Cafeteria of Miami Valley Hospital in Dayton Ohio. Creative collaboration with Deck the Walls and App Architecture

Just Half the Story | Tell Me More than Camera Settings

Early March at Cedar Falls in Hocking Hills Ohio by Jim Crotty
Early March at Cedar Falls in Hocking Hills Ohio by Jim Crotty

A photographer can describe a photograph in two ways.

Or a combination of both.

There is the description of the mechanics of the image – the camera and lens used and the camera settings as well as any accessories or filters applied during the exposure. I was reminded of such a description while reading the latest issue of Nature Photographer Magazine. Many beautiful images, and technically sound.

For this image such a description would read as follows – Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF24-70mm f2.8L USM lens. Exposure mode was aperture priority at f/16. Focal length was 27mm. ISO 50. Evaluative metering mode. Wait a minute, something I’m forgetting . . . oh yeah, shutter speed was one second. Oh, and I used a Giottos carbon fiber tripod, Kirk BH-1 ballhead and Kirk L-bracket. And a Canon RS-80N3 remote switch. And I was wearing my Vasque St. Elias GTX hiking boots too, which are pretty awesome by the way. Location was Cedar Falls in Hocking Hills State Park, Ohio. Date was March 6 2016. Capture time as 1:15:26 PM.

Still there? Good.

Bear with me.

There are many who prefer such a description below an image, and there’s absolutely nothing wrong with being more technically concerned with such information. But for me it is too defining, too closed-in, to withholding of the full potential of a photograph as both art of expression and extension of the photographer.

Truth be told it doesn’t take much to duplicate the image using just the technical information and the location.

But I always desire to go further, out beyond the mechanics of merely recording a second in time at a particular location. I want to see and contemplate how and why the presentation of moment and setting resounded in the photographer’s mind and heart to stop and record light in how it was being FELT, by first making use of his or her knowledge and experience of both equipment and exposure, and then letting go of preconceived expectations of what a particular audience wants to see and allow the vision and personality of the soul take priority.

That’s what an audience craves, whether they realize it or not.

It takes a bit more effort, and courage. There a comes a time when the growth of a photographer when he or she MUST place him or herself in every image and not just demonstrate technical proficiency. I think that’s exactly how I would describe the difference between beginning/amateur and experienced pro. There’s nothing to prove anymore other than the artist’s desire and joy in free expression unhindered by a lack of basic technical skill and experience (which I admit is necessary).

Unfortunately it feels as if everything in today’s world of instant entertainment and shallow appearances works against the full nurturing and crafting of artistic vision, and I fear so much of what truly makes an excellent image stand-out and tell a story is getting lost among all the noise.

Art is our treasure, a treasure that transcends time, for in art we see both the soul of the artist and a reflection of our own divine nature that strives to reach the uncommon and higher road.

Here’s how I prefer to describe the image posted here with this article –

Early March in Hocking Hills, Ohio, along the trail to Cedar Falls. A longer time exposure to convey the movement of water flowing from the first signs of winter’s release and a wider focal length to compose both foreground and background so that I could communicate both source and flow. This is a reawakening of life in the woods and the first signs of movement toward change in seasons, in both the landscape and within me personally. It was a challenging winter and a soon-to-be even more challenging spring. Changes had to come for new, vibrant growth to take place. I desired to part of that flow, to something greater, something better, and in the deepness of that pool I felt my soul and spirit move under the direction of a loving and guiding hand.

Yeah, I think I life that description better.

Opportunity ? Storefront art project seeks to attract new businesses downtown

Storefront art project seeks to attract new businesses downtown

This could be a good opportunity for artists in the Dayton area, but the artist needs to consider what his or her expenses are when it comes to printing, framing, displaying, transport, time for set-up and take down, etc., etc. I’m suggesting that individual artists consider the potential return on such an investment.

Sometimes the only results are more requests to donate work for  . . . “exposure,” and on it goes.

This is not to say such results will hold true for other artists. This particular opportunity in Dayton could very well could lead to a prominent installation and profitable print sale. I like to think the quality and originality is what will sell the work, but I have my doubts when it comes to the local “art community.” I’m just suggesting to closely look at upfront expenses and then weigh and measure as to the potential return.

Art is business, no matter what the medium. The individual artist eventually must come to that realization and then press this fact with local art gallery owners, decorators, non-profit organizations, etc. When the local gatekeepers refuse to respond with consideration and respect of the artist as a professional then it’s time to seek victories elsewhere.

Too many times in Dayton I’ve experienced situations where people assume an artist can easily afford to give away his or her work for nothing. Once a particular artist has been labeled as such the damage is done and the local market turns toxic. Lesson learned and time to move on.

But this very well could be worth looking into.