Category Archives: Nature Photography

Nature photography by Jim Crotty Picture Ohio including landscapes, flora, wildlife, waterfalls, woodlands, streams, parks for fine art prints and stock licensing sales

Black and White Art Presentation at Visceral Gallery in Centerville

Visceral Gallery Events

This past week I had the opportunity to visit Visceral Gallery here in Centerville. The gallery owner – Francine Riley – has done an excellent job in establishing a true, artistic presence and experience in the middle of Centerville’s “historic district.” Visceral reminds me of the galleries I’ve visited in many resort towns out west and the heavily traveled, high dollar tourist towns down south. The emphasis is where it should be – on the art. The space within is warm and welcoming, encouraging visitors to linger. The lighting is exceptional with lots of attention to detail. It was obvious to me that Francine had a professional education and training in both the craft of presentation as well as in the business of selling fine art. I wish her well.

Currently Visceral is hosting a invitation-only, juried exhibition titled “Colored Restrained.” The emphasis is on black and white presentation in a variety of mediums, both 2-D and 3-D. The show is impressive with some very strong talent on display.

A 16″x24″ print of one of my recent works in monochrome conversions of high dynamic range photographs was selected for the “Color Restrained” show at Visceral. The piece – titled “Hidden Treasure” – is a macro photograph of a closed Queen Anne’s Lace in Sugarcreek MetroPark.

Fine Art Black and White Photography by Jim Crotty
Fine Art Black and White Photography by Jim Crotty
Hidden Treasure Black and White Print by Photographer Jim Crotty
Hidden Treasure Black and White Print by Photographer Jim Crotty

New Book and Magazine Released Featuring Jim Crotty Photography

My most recent release via the Blurb.com bookstore – “Renewal,” featuring spring photography of landscapes in both Hocking Hills State Park of Ohio and Great Smoky Mountain National Park in Tennessee. This volume is available in both softcover and hardcover formats as an 8″x10″ coffee-table style book, perfect for office lobbies or home. In addition to presenting stunning nature and landscape photographs from these scenic areas of Appalachia the book also includes an introspective essay titled “Life’s Lessons Learned on the Trail to Ramsay Cascade.” This was an article I drafted shortly after my May excursion to The Smokies and provides some insight on how life experiences are often paralleled in the most simple journeys through the natural landscape. The price for the soft-cover version is $29.95, not including shipping.

Cover image of Renewal nature photography book by Jim Crotty
Cover image of Renewal nature photography book by Jim Crotty

I’m also pleased to announce the first issue of what I hope to become a regular series of self-published magazines, titled “The Poet’s Eye.” This 24-page, 8.5×11 publication includes a brief introduction about the work presented and select images representing a particular subject, location or photographic technique. This, the first issue, features my recent work with converting high dynamic range photographs to monochrome – black and white – fine art images. The cost per issue is $7.84.

The Poet's Eye Photography Magazine by Jim Crotty
The Poet's Eye Photography Magazine by Jim Crotty

If you’re a regular user of Facebook there is a group page for Jim Crotty Photography. I often post new images and information regarding published images, commercial photography assignments and my photography workshops to this interactive group page which also allows followers to post their information and comments. Check it out.

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A Visual Celebration of the End of Summer

While most people celebrate the end of summer with back to school and Labor Day activities, I prefer to take notice of the turning of the season, a turning toward what I like to call the “good light.” Softening sunlight and lengthening shadows and fields that turn to gold. This is the nature photographer’s best season when capturing images of the Ohio landscape. It’s also the primary reason I’ve scheduled my first, full-day photography workshop for the weekend of September 26th.

The End of Summer on the Ohio Landscape by Jim Crotty
The End of Summer on the Ohio Landscape by Jim Crotty

It is also with some melancholy that I say farewell to the summer of 2009. Back in May I made a goal of making this past summer one full of positive experiences from the limited time I have available to spend with my daughters, Emma, age 10, and Chloe, age nine. Making this my goal was in response of regretting not doing such during the summer of 2008. You see I am a single, divorced dad of two very special little girls. During the school year they live with their mother in Texas. Emma and Chloe are my everything, and I’ve made it no secret that there is NOTHING for me in Ohio that comes close to being worth the pain I go through when I have to say goodbye and put them on that American Airlines flight back to Texas.

I mean it – NOTHING, especially Dayton. I don’t think I need to explain that point further for most regular readers of this blog.

I succeeded in accomplishing my goal for this past summer, so much so that the pain of the goodbye (at least for me) was as sharp and searing as it has ever been.

And it’s with that emotion of love and commitment to my children that I present the following video and images, most of which were taken during my daughter’s last week with me in mid-August and going through the lonely days following to the beginning of September.

The visual artist creates what is discovered in the light from that which is felt within.

Photography by Jim Crotty : Four Image Poster Print Storefront

Photography by Jim Crotty : FourImagePosterPrints

The rule of four. Selecting just four photographs that best represent my artistic vision of a particular location. That’s what I had in mind in the creation of four image poster prints. Fine art nature and landscape photography that I’ve taken in locations such as Dayton, Hocking Hills, New Mexico, The Smokies and more.

Each of these four image poster prints are now available for online purchase on my Imagekind storefront. Customers are presented a variety of options including print size, frames and paper. Imagekind does an exceptional job in both print quality and packaging (see YouTube video with this post), and the prices are VERY reasonable.

I’ll be adding even more selections to the four image poster print storefront in the weeks to come, including my photography of Zion and Glacier National Parks.

Jim Crotty presents four image poster print of Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Jim Crotty presents four image poster print of Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty presents Sugarcreek Four Image Poster Print
Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty presents Sugarcreek Four Image Poster Print
Dayton Photographer Jim Crotty presents Seasons of Ohio
Dayton Photographer Jim Crotty presents Seasons of Ohio
New Mexico Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
New Mexico Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
Landscape Photography by Jim Crotty of the South Carolina Lowcountry
Landscape Photography by Jim Crotty of the South Carolina Lowcountry
Photographer Jim Crotty The Inn at Cedar Falls
Photographer Jim Crotty The Inn at Cedar Falls
Gettysburg Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
Gettysburg Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
Dayton Four Image Poster Print by Jim Crotty
Dayton Four Image Poster Print by Jim Crotty

Outdoor Photographer August 2009 Issue Best Yet

Over the years I think I’ve subscribed to nearly all of major photography magazines. You name it, I’ve read it. Many photography publications are directed strictly toward the average hobbyist market, relying heavily on advertising from the big retailers that sell just about any type of photo gear you can imagine.

There are other photography magazines directed strictly toward the professional photographer. These are the publications with impressive portfolios and practical information on everything from studio lighting to optimal digital workflow.

There’s one photography magazine that has been able to consistently offer editorial content that is suited for both advanced hobbyist and professional shooter, particularly those who enjoy nature and landscape photography. Outdoor Photographer is that magazine, and this month’s issue is the best yet. It is timely that the August 2009 issue came to my attention now because it will serve as an excellent reference resource for my upcoming, full-day photography workshops on nature and landscape photography, the first of which is scheduled for September 26, 2009 at Cox Arboretum here in Dayton (it filled-up quite some time ago, but I will be doing another one this winter).

The articles that I found to be most interesting were “Get 4×5 Quality with a DSLR,” by Dennis Frates; “Get Into the Stock Market,” by Art Wolfe (thanks Art for introducing me to PhotoShelter back at the NANPA Summit in Albuquerque); “The Zone System Revisited,” by Ken Rockwell; “Making Your Best Black-And-White,” by Richard Lopinto; and “The Big Trip,” by Mark Edward Harris.

This why Outdoor Photographer is one of those magazines that I actually take the time to read from cover to back. It always deliver, especially if you are a photographer who is constantly seeking new information and ways to improve your craft, and who isn’t ? The constant learning process is what makes photography so much fun, whether you’re just starting out or an established professional.

The following images aren’t directly related to this blog entry other than they were taken by a “photographer” (me) and “outdoors.” Plus I thought it would be fun just to post them and provide a little variety. The landscape images were captured on the evening of July 16, 2006 from Dead Horse Point near Moab, Utah, overlooking Canyonlands National Park. Something kind of cool happened to me when I was out there photographing the scenes and the sunset that evening. Can’t quite explain it, but I think it comes through with the images.

The skyline shot is of Cincinnati during the 2006 Tall Stacks Festival.

Sunset from Dead Horse Point Utah by Jim Crotty

Colorado River from Dead Horse Point by Jim Crotty

Canyonlands National Park from Dead Horse Point by Jim Crotty

Tall Stacks Cincinnati 2006 by Jim Crotty

Teaching a Photography Workshop at Wegerzyn Garden in Dayton

The Photographer At Work

Originally uploaded by Sue Combs.

Thanks to workshop attendee Sue Combs, who was at my short, photography workshop yesterday at Wegerzyn Gardens in Dayton. She snapped this shot of me as I was demonstrating the use of a Lensbaby lens in photographing a Sunflower. I like the angle she’s using, how she composed the image and the choice of a narrow depth of field.

I think there were close to 100 people who attended the program. The Thursday prior to the workshop I contacted the Five Rivers MetroParks office with a “heads-up” on my anticipating a VERY large turn-out. The staff responded promptly with the addition of a second instructor, Adam Alonzo, another very talented photographer here in the Dayton area and experienced instructor. We were able to divide the group into two sections.

While I presented a practical application of basic flower photography techniques, outside in the gardens, Adam conducted an indoor, classroom presentation through the use of laptop and LCD projector. Half way through the one and hour workshop, the two groups switched. This gave everyone an opportunity to receive instruction from myself and Adam, in both classroom and outdoor settings.

All is well that ended well. A special thanks goes out to Adam and the staff at Five Rivers/Wegerzyn.

What’s great is that I now have a waiting list started for not only my full-day photography workshop at Cox Arboretum on September 26, but the registration list for a second, full-day program is already half-full. I limit these programs to just 20 people. The cost is $89 per person, which includes lunch.

I’m going to see how well these first, two full-day workshops go and then I will most likely establish a regular schedule, perhaps a program every one or two months.

To find out more, see http://www.ohiophoto.org/PresentationsWorkshops/PhotographyWorkshops.html