Category Archives: Marketing

Thoughts and tips on marketing as well as advice on how professional photography can make a difference with your marketing message

Promoting Photography Online and the Importance of Good Metadata

I like using both awstats and Google Analytics in measuring the traffic and sources for both my main site, http://ohiophoto.org, and my business blog, http://calmphotos.com.

There were over 144,000 hits to CalmPhotos for the month of June alone. I can’t emphasize enough the affordable effectiveness of David Esrati’s Websiteology training program and the power of WordPress for blogging for business.

Never again will I waist one dime on phone directory advertising.

The traffic to OhioPhoto.org – I static site I manage on my own using Rapidweaver and Blue Host – is starting to pick-up in traffic again (17,500 for June versus 23,500 for July), even though it had fallen quite a bit behind CalmPhotos.com. It was interesting to note the top keywords used, via this morning’s Google Analytics report, to access this site:

jim crotty
jim crotty photography
photography workshops in ohio
jim crotty picture ohio
ohio photography workshops
ohio photography
picturesqueohio.com
photography workshop ohio
photography workshops ohio
picturesque ohio

That’s the power of good keywording and cross-linking. I rarely post a web-ready image that I haven’t inserted good meta-data. I do this in both Photoshop CS3 and Apple Aperture, through custom export settings.

It’s well worth the extra effort.

And another advantage to getting up early to check my web stats is the opportunity to step-out on my back porch and capture a scene like this –

Summer Photography in the Colorado Rockies

Just last week I traveled to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado with my daughter Emma, age 10. I learned the hard way last summer to make the best of the time I have with my daughters, so this year I planned a special trip with both of them. For Chloe, age eight, it was Washington D.C. last month. For Emma it was the mountains in Colorado. During the school year they live in Texas with their mother, and the winters here in Ohio for me, as a single dad, can be pretty tough. So far this summer is going much better. We’re having a ton of fun and capturing some great photographs.

I didn’t do a lot of my nature and landscape photography while with Emma in Colorado, but she did help me with the filming of another episode in my ongoing video tutorials on photography, this one titled “Alpine Wildflowers and Light Anxiety.” The first half of this segment is a little shaky. My apologies. My camera operator is still learning.

Another topic I wanted to mention is the art and business of the fine art nature gallery. Whenever I visit resort towns, particularly out west, I love to browse the retail galleries of some of the top professional nature and landscape photographers. They’ve got it going on. While we were in Frisco, Colorado we wandered around a bit in the retail gallery of Colorado Photographer Todd Powell. His work is jaw-dropping gorgeous, and in his gallery he does all of his own printmaking and mounting.

Another gallery that just blew me away was that of Tom Mangelsen, located in the terminal of Denver International Airport. WOW ! Incredibly beautiful prints, meticulously composed, captured and edited. Tom raises the bar of excellence for any nature and landscape photographer who aspires to fly in the stratosphere of professional success and accomplishment. Tom Till, Art Wolfe, Jim Brandenburg, John Shaw and David Middleton also rank right up there with the best of the best when it comes to fine art nature and landscape photography.

I would love to have had a successful gallery operation, such as those of any of the above mentioned photographers, here in the Dayton area. I’m confident I have the body of local photographic work as well as the necessary skill, knowledge and equipment for fine art printmaking. In fact I somewhat attempted the effort at my previous retail location, off of Far Hills in Centerville. Sadly I didn’t receive hardly any foot traffic (other than salespeople) until I announced I was closing the store and marking all of my print inventory drastically down. That turned-out to be the confirmation of what I have always suspected to be the case with the local art market.

The problem with Dayton (and for that matter, all of Ohio) is that the market just isn’t there. Fine art print galleries are always most successful in high- dollar, tourist areas, such as in and around the grand vistas and National Parks of the American West. There are some notable exceptions, but the one constant is easy access to customers who 1) have the disposable income to purchase fine art nature and landscape prints, and 2) APPRECIATE and know the skill and artistic talent required to create incredibly striking nature and landscape photography.

It’s a shame because I have discovered Ohio to be rich in scenic locations that translate beautifully into fine art prints, providing buyers of professional nature photography with a unique, local touch to how they decorate homes and offices. Unfortunately here in Dayton the photographers who have achieved that level of skill often get pushed to the side or grouped-in with other visual artists, whether it be at public showings or in galleries. Been there. Done that. It’s not for me.

The best I can do at this point is “build my market” where it doesn’t exist. I think I’m making progress, but I – and the local market – have a long way to go. Perhaps someday.