Category Archives: Travel Photography

Working with Light and Subject for the Perfect Shot

The Eagle Hunters – Working a Composition |

My dream assignment – The Eagle Hunters of Mongolia. Top pro photographer Art Wolfe demonstrates how he works with such incredible subjects in challenging outdoor conditions, changing his position and angle until subject and light come together for the perfect photograph.

January on the Colorado Plateau

The following landscape photographs and video are just a small sample of what I captured during last week’s trip to Zion National Park, on the northwest section of the Colorado Plateau in Utah. There are many more on the way. These were just a few I edited and prepared for posting online during my flight from Las Vegas to Columbus, using my MacBook Pro. The magic of the winter light in the canyons is hauntingly beautiful with the added benefit of the tourists of summer long gone.

Chase Jarvis Best Camera is Best iPhone App

Chase Jarvis Blog: The Best Camera: iPhone App + Book + Community.

Being an iPhone user I am always on the lookout for useful apps, particularly those that are connected in some way to photography. Given the fact that my iPhone 3G (I still haven’t seen the need to upgrade to a 3Gs) comes with a minimalist approach toward a built-in camera phone – just 2 megapixels – there have more and more app developers who’ve learned to push that little camera beyond its original, technical limitations.

I learned about Chase Jarvis’ Best Camera app in the most recent issue of PDN Magazine. The Best Camera is by far the best camera app yet for the iPhone. It seamlessly integrates the camera function with some impressive in-camera, image editing effects as well online photo sharing and social community interaction.

The premise of the app is quite simple and one which I repeat quite often at my photography workshops and in photography articles. It’s not the gear that makes the photographer. It’s the person behind the camera and a keen observation of light and subject.

I must admit that nature, landscape and studio photography is a bit more methodical and requires more in the way of gear and technical knowledge, especially at the pro level, but for “street photography” Jarvis does an impressive job in showing what can be accomplished with just a simple, two- megapixel camera phone. Sure Jarvis makes a crack about “dynamic range,” but basically his approach toward image-making is the foundation from which all successful photographers – whether they be accomplished pro shooters or avid amateurs – create bodies of work that make viewers stop, look, imagine and think.

Photography by Jim Crotty : Four Image Poster Print Storefront

Photography by Jim Crotty : FourImagePosterPrints

The rule of four. Selecting just four photographs that best represent my artistic vision of a particular location. That’s what I had in mind in the creation of four image poster prints. Fine art nature and landscape photography that I’ve taken in locations such as Dayton, Hocking Hills, New Mexico, The Smokies and more.

Each of these four image poster prints are now available for online purchase on my Imagekind storefront. Customers are presented a variety of options including print size, frames and paper. Imagekind does an exceptional job in both print quality and packaging (see YouTube video with this post), and the prices are VERY reasonable.

I’ll be adding even more selections to the four image poster print storefront in the weeks to come, including my photography of Zion and Glacier National Parks.

Jim Crotty presents four image poster print of Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Jim Crotty presents four image poster print of Great Smoky Mountain National Park
Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty presents Sugarcreek Four Image Poster Print
Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty presents Sugarcreek Four Image Poster Print
Dayton Photographer Jim Crotty presents Seasons of Ohio
Dayton Photographer Jim Crotty presents Seasons of Ohio
New Mexico Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
New Mexico Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
Landscape Photography by Jim Crotty of the South Carolina Lowcountry
Landscape Photography by Jim Crotty of the South Carolina Lowcountry
Photographer Jim Crotty The Inn at Cedar Falls
Photographer Jim Crotty The Inn at Cedar Falls
Gettysburg Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
Gettysburg Four Image Poster Print by Ohio Photographer Jim Crotty
Dayton Four Image Poster Print by Jim Crotty
Dayton Four Image Poster Print by Jim Crotty

Outdoor Photographer August 2009 Issue Best Yet

Over the years I think I’ve subscribed to nearly all of major photography magazines. You name it, I’ve read it. Many photography publications are directed strictly toward the average hobbyist market, relying heavily on advertising from the big retailers that sell just about any type of photo gear you can imagine.

There are other photography magazines directed strictly toward the professional photographer. These are the publications with impressive portfolios and practical information on everything from studio lighting to optimal digital workflow.

There’s one photography magazine that has been able to consistently offer editorial content that is suited for both advanced hobbyist and professional shooter, particularly those who enjoy nature and landscape photography. Outdoor Photographer is that magazine, and this month’s issue is the best yet. It is timely that the August 2009 issue came to my attention now because it will serve as an excellent reference resource for my upcoming, full-day photography workshops on nature and landscape photography, the first of which is scheduled for September 26, 2009 at Cox Arboretum here in Dayton (it filled-up quite some time ago, but I will be doing another one this winter).

The articles that I found to be most interesting were “Get 4×5 Quality with a DSLR,” by Dennis Frates; “Get Into the Stock Market,” by Art Wolfe (thanks Art for introducing me to PhotoShelter back at the NANPA Summit in Albuquerque); “The Zone System Revisited,” by Ken Rockwell; “Making Your Best Black-And-White,” by Richard Lopinto; and “The Big Trip,” by Mark Edward Harris.

This why Outdoor Photographer is one of those magazines that I actually take the time to read from cover to back. It always deliver, especially if you are a photographer who is constantly seeking new information and ways to improve your craft, and who isn’t ? The constant learning process is what makes photography so much fun, whether you’re just starting out or an established professional.

The following images aren’t directly related to this blog entry other than they were taken by a “photographer” (me) and “outdoors.” Plus I thought it would be fun just to post them and provide a little variety. The landscape images were captured on the evening of July 16, 2006 from Dead Horse Point near Moab, Utah, overlooking Canyonlands National Park. Something kind of cool happened to me when I was out there photographing the scenes and the sunset that evening. Can’t quite explain it, but I think it comes through with the images.

The skyline shot is of Cincinnati during the 2006 Tall Stacks Festival.

Sunset from Dead Horse Point Utah by Jim Crotty

Colorado River from Dead Horse Point by Jim Crotty

Canyonlands National Park from Dead Horse Point by Jim Crotty

Tall Stacks Cincinnati 2006 by Jim Crotty

Summer Photography in the Colorado Rockies

Just last week I traveled to the Rocky Mountains of Colorado with my daughter Emma, age 10. I learned the hard way last summer to make the best of the time I have with my daughters, so this year I planned a special trip with both of them. For Chloe, age eight, it was Washington D.C. last month. For Emma it was the mountains in Colorado. During the school year they live in Texas with their mother, and the winters here in Ohio for me, as a single dad, can be pretty tough. So far this summer is going much better. We’re having a ton of fun and capturing some great photographs.

I didn’t do a lot of my nature and landscape photography while with Emma in Colorado, but she did help me with the filming of another episode in my ongoing video tutorials on photography, this one titled “Alpine Wildflowers and Light Anxiety.” The first half of this segment is a little shaky. My apologies. My camera operator is still learning.

Another topic I wanted to mention is the art and business of the fine art nature gallery. Whenever I visit resort towns, particularly out west, I love to browse the retail galleries of some of the top professional nature and landscape photographers. They’ve got it going on. While we were in Frisco, Colorado we wandered around a bit in the retail gallery of Colorado Photographer Todd Powell. His work is jaw-dropping gorgeous, and in his gallery he does all of his own printmaking and mounting.

Another gallery that just blew me away was that of Tom Mangelsen, located in the terminal of Denver International Airport. WOW ! Incredibly beautiful prints, meticulously composed, captured and edited. Tom raises the bar of excellence for any nature and landscape photographer who aspires to fly in the stratosphere of professional success and accomplishment. Tom Till, Art Wolfe, Jim Brandenburg, John Shaw and David Middleton also rank right up there with the best of the best when it comes to fine art nature and landscape photography.

I would love to have had a successful gallery operation, such as those of any of the above mentioned photographers, here in the Dayton area. I’m confident I have the body of local photographic work as well as the necessary skill, knowledge and equipment for fine art printmaking. In fact I somewhat attempted the effort at my previous retail location, off of Far Hills in Centerville. Sadly I didn’t receive hardly any foot traffic (other than salespeople) until I announced I was closing the store and marking all of my print inventory drastically down. That turned-out to be the confirmation of what I have always suspected to be the case with the local art market.

The problem with Dayton (and for that matter, all of Ohio) is that the market just isn’t there. Fine art print galleries are always most successful in high- dollar, tourist areas, such as in and around the grand vistas and National Parks of the American West. There are some notable exceptions, but the one constant is easy access to customers who 1) have the disposable income to purchase fine art nature and landscape prints, and 2) APPRECIATE and know the skill and artistic talent required to create incredibly striking nature and landscape photography.

It’s a shame because I have discovered Ohio to be rich in scenic locations that translate beautifully into fine art prints, providing buyers of professional nature photography with a unique, local touch to how they decorate homes and offices. Unfortunately here in Dayton the photographers who have achieved that level of skill often get pushed to the side or grouped-in with other visual artists, whether it be at public showings or in galleries. Been there. Done that. It’s not for me.

The best I can do at this point is “build my market” where it doesn’t exist. I think I’m making progress, but I – and the local market – have a long way to go. Perhaps someday.