Chase Jarvis Best Camera is Best iPhone App

Chase Jarvis Blog: The Best Camera: iPhone App + Book + Community.

Being an iPhone user I am always on the lookout for useful apps, particularly those that are connected in some way to photography. Given the fact that my iPhone 3G (I still haven’t seen the need to upgrade to a 3Gs) comes with a minimalist approach toward a built-in camera phone – just 2 megapixels – there have more and more app developers who’ve learned to push that little camera beyond its original, technical limitations.

I learned about Chase Jarvis’ Best Camera app in the most recent issue of PDN Magazine. The Best Camera is by far the best camera app yet for the iPhone. It seamlessly integrates the camera function with some impressive in-camera, image editing effects as well online photo sharing and social community interaction.

The premise of the app is quite simple and one which I repeat quite often at my photography workshops and in photography articles. It’s not the gear that makes the photographer. It’s the person behind the camera and a keen observation of light and subject.

I must admit that nature, landscape and studio photography is a bit more methodical and requires more in the way of gear and technical knowledge, especially at the pro level, but for “street photography” Jarvis does an impressive job in showing what can be accomplished with just a simple, two- megapixel camera phone. Sure Jarvis makes a crack about “dynamic range,” but basically his approach toward image-making is the foundation from which all successful photographers – whether they be accomplished pro shooters or avid amateurs – create bodies of work that make viewers stop, look, imagine and think.

Season of the Good Light

Episode seven in my series of “Photographic Moment” video tutorials. “Season of the Good Light” provides some practical tips on capturing the Ohio landscape in autumn, including white balance and ISO settings, shutter speed, aperture and composition. This video was shot on location in the tall grass prairie of Sugarcreek MetroPark.

Workshop on Digital Workflow for Nature Photography

I’m happy to announce my next full-day photography workshop, set for Saturday, November 21 2009 at Cox Arboretum MetroPark, just south of Dayton, Ohio. The primary topic of this program will be digital workflow for nature photography including image importing and editing using Apple Aperture, fine tuning and enhancements in Photoshop CS4, monochrome conversions using Nik Color Efex Pro and High Dynamic Range Photography using Photomatix. As of 10-6-09 there are already 10 people registered to attend. I limit my workshops to 20 attendees, so there are still 10 seats remaining, however, I expect these to fill within the next day or two. There will be another workshop this winter, most likely on a Saturday in late January or early February, so it’s always a good idea for those interested to submit their names and emails to my waiting list.

Digital Photography for the Nature Photographer Workshop Presented by Jim Crotty
Digital Photography for the Nature Photographer Workshop Presented by Jim Crotty

Photo Published on Cover of Ohio State Parks Magazine

I’m happy to announce that one of my photographs has once again made the cover of Ohio State Parks Magazine. The most recent issue – fall/winter 2009 – features an image I captured while in Hocking Hills State Park during a weekend in early November. I was there with my two favorite fellow sojourners when venturing out to the woodlands and hollows of Hocking, my daughters Emma and Chloe. Over the last five years this is the fourth issue one of my photographs was selected for the cover of Ohio State Parks.

Ohio State Parks Magazine Fall 2009 with Photograph by Jim Crotty
Ohio State Parks Magazine Fall 2009 with Photograph by Jim Crotty

With all the emphasis currently on our system of National Parks, thanks to another exceptional series airing on PBS by Ken Burns, it’s easy to overlook the beauty and the gifts offered through our local and state parks. I’ve visited and photographed many National Parks, including Great Smoky, Grand Teton, Glacier, Zion, Capital Reef, Bryce, Arches, Canyonlands and Rocky Mountain. All of these strikingly beautiful parks present natural scenery that is beyond breathtaking, there’s no doubt. However, it’s the local, visual treasures found here in my home state of Ohio where my creative spirit and nature-loving soul feels the most at home. Especially Hocking Hills. That’s where my love for nature and landscape photography first took flight during a winter hike with the nature photography club from the Dayton Museum of Natural History (now Boonshoft), so long ago when I was 13 years old.

The State Parks in Ohio are now under a considerable amount of pressure to reduce services and cut costs. It’s a shame. If our National Parks are truly “America’s best idea,” (did you know that Ohio has a National Park ? It’s Cuyahoga, between Cleveland and Akron) then state and local parks and natural areas are the second best idea. In some ways these smaller versions of their big cousins are even more important to protect and preserve due to the fact that they represent places where most people make “first contact” with the beauty and wonder of nature. I’ve always said that the City of Dayton’s best recreational asset is the Five Rivers MetroParks. Considering the shrinking population and economic base in the Dayton area, we are VERY fortunate to have a relatively large number of local parks which are easily accessible, well-managed and each in their own way, provide the essential connection to the healing powers of our natural environment.

HDR Photography Hot Topic at Workshop

In presenting my first, full-day workshop on nature photography, yesterday at Cox Arboretum, the topic that generated the most interest was my work with high dynamic range photography. This slide presentation was created from the images I used at the workshop to illustrate this particular creative technique with digital photography. I like to emphasize that HDR photography – the merging of two or more exposures of the same scene – is NOT digitally adding or altering the image. It simply brings forth a much greater tonal range amongst the existing elements within the photograph. The trick is not to be too “heavy handed” when applying the various settings for gamma, white point, luminosity, etc. when using the tonal adjustment tool.

The September 26 workshop at Cox Arboretum in Dayton went very well, despite it being my first time presenting a full-day program. I limited the attendees to just over 20 people. This was a good, manageable group. I will be presenting another full-day program on a Saturday this January, at which time I will probably concentrate more on digital workflow using Apple Aperture and various digital techniques using both Photoshop and Photomatix.

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