Category Archives: Monochrome

Framed Giclée Prints from Imagekind

Showing one of the framed, black and white Giclée prints that I recently ordered from my online storefront on Imagekind. This particular image is an excellent example of the pleasing results achieved when converting an HDR photograph to monochrome. The photograph is a combination of five exposures, combined using Photomatix Pro. I then fine tune using the tonal adjustment tool, bring the 16-bit TIFF file into Aperture and then convert to monochrome (black and white) through the use of Nik Silver Efex Pro plug-in, which I love because of its effectiveness when doing targeted adjustments. I’m excited about the coming release of Nik’s HDR Efex Pro.

On Saturday, November 6, 2010 I will be presenting an afternoon workshop at Cox Arboretum, designed for those photographers who are more experienced and advanced with digital workflow and editing. I’ll be going over my step-by-step process for HDR nature photography, from in-camera capture to final print.

Western Skyscape in Black and White Photography

The winter landscape in Zion National Park, Utah. Dramatic sky at sunset, captured in black and white photography. I captured this image last January. Original is three exposures merged for HDR and then converted to black and white using the Nik Silver Efex Pro plug-in and targeted adjustments. Camera used was a Canon 1D Mark III with Canon 17-35 f2.8 L lens.

Winter Sky Over Virgin River in black and white by Jim Crotty
Winter Sky Over Virgin River in black and white by Jim Crotty

Again, back to black and white photography

I keep finding myself returning to monochrome – aka black and white – photography, particularly when converting from original digital files that are high dynamic range. My favorite digital tools for crafting these images includes Apple Aperture and the Nik plug-ins. When completed with care and attention to detail, the fine art black and white photograph should evoke a viewer reaction reminiscent of the works of the early masters, particularly Weston and Adams. I’m not sure if I will ever achieve work of that caliber, but it’s sure fun to try.